Pet Care

Pet's death impacts many

Over the past couple weeks, the media covered a regrettable incident that took place in Westlake. It involved an on-duty police officer and resulted in the death of a family dog. On March 6, a Westlake officer responded to a home security system alarm, and fatally shot Callaway, an eight-year-old yellow Labrador retriever. The patrolman maintains that he was threatened by the charging dog and fired his weapon in defense. 

I am deeply saddened by this family's loss and suffering. I have provided this family's professional pet services for many years, and enjoyed a special bond with Callaway. If I could speak to Callaway, I would say:

“If I could bring you back, I would in a heartbeat, but I can't. I am so sorry that you are no longer with us, but I can say for sure that you are with some other angels that are loved and missed each day. Your life and story have touched so many people.
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Volume 2, Issue 6, Posted 5:51 PM, 03.16.2010

People food to avoid feeding your pet

Nutrition experts at the ASPCA have put together a handy list of the top toxic people foods to avoid feeding your pet.

As always, if you suspect your pet has eaten any of the following foods, please note the amount ingested and contact your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at 888-426-4435.

Dangerous Foods for Pets:

  • Chocolate
  • Coffee
  • Caffeine
  • Alcohol
  • Avocado
  • Macadamia nuts
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Volume 1, Issue 6, Posted 9:35 PM, 10.28.2009

The kennel is full!

The kennel at the Bay Village Police Department is full of cats and kittens in need of forever homes.

Donations of unopened canned and dry dog/cat food, litter pans and gift certificates to animal hospitals are greatly needed and appreciated.

Please spay and neuter your pets and do not let them roam.

Please contact Bay Village Animal Control Officer, Diana Fife at 440-899-3414.

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Volume 1, Issue 6, Posted 9:25 PM, 10.28.2009

Protect the pup on warm and sunny days!

Just like humans, our animals are prone to skin cancers and other consequences of the heat.

“If we feel hot, they even feel hotter!”

According to local veterinarian Stephanie Dean, the main point about dogs and heat stroke is that because of their fur coats and the limited mechanisms of heat exchange (panting and sweating through their feet), if we feel hot, they even feel hotter, especially on those humid Cleveland days.

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Volume 1, Issue 4, Posted 10:23 PM, 09.24.2009